Expanding Your Network 15 Minutes at a Time

This year Sue has been using an old-fashioned method to expand her social network. Because she's doing it right, it has not only delivered results but it's been fun.

Any time she comes across the social media profile of someone interesting (from a professional perspective) she spends a little time learning more about them, then invites them to have a 15-minute phone call to get to know each other. She calls them "Getting to Know Each Other" calls. (I'm the writer in the family but since she pays my bills I'll stay out of her business.)

Yes, that's right, it's the old "Can I buy you a cup of coffee?" ploy, ruined by professional networkers a decade ago.

Here's how Sue does it right:

  1. She spent the time to develop a reputation for sincerity and generosity.
  2. She takes the time to get to know something about the other person, even interacting at their blog or other social media accounts, before she raises the idea of chatting on the phone.
  3. When she approaches them, she expresses a specific interest in something they do or offer.
  4. Wait, before that, she actually feels a genuine interest in something they do or offer. That's the whole point: they're professionally interesting.
  5. She uses a simple free tool called Calendly to allow them to schedule their call anytime she's free and which is convenient for them. No phone tag or endless scheduling emails.
  6. During the conversation, she actually listens to them, treats them with dignity and respect, and only shares what Ausoma does as something that might support their business. No sales pitch. Ever. (Did we get that part? That's what killed the "cup of coffee" gag, remember?)
  7. She keeps in touch, and when she finds something of value to them she shares it.

The theme there is generosity. People can tell when you're "having a chat" but it's all about you.

They can also tell, from a mile away, when you're a sincere and generous person who believes that the more you help others, the better your own business and life are.

Twitter's New Rules and Why They Won't Matter to You

Follow us. We know the way.
Follow us. We know the way.
The social media folks at Edgar wrote a super article about Twitter's most recent changes to their terms of service (TOS.) Every time one of the big platforms changes the rules, folks freak.

We don't.

Our service is based on good marketing principles, which are based on thinking like a human being, on generosity, on, believe it or not, kindness. And nobody's TOS will ever ban those principles.

The New Rules and Our Solutions

Here are the two big changes at Twitter mentioned in the article, and why, despite their sweeping nature, they won't matter round these parts.

… more … "Twitter's New Rules and Why They Won't Matter to You"

Best Times to Post on Social Media: Rules vs Principles vs Reality

There is no "best time to post" on any social media.

Any study that claims to reveal the perfect time to post on any social media platform is, instead, revealing the mathematical results of an algorithm they used to calculate certain (possibly beneficial) outcomes at one particular moment in time, for some general group of posters.

No one can possibly tell you when the bulk of your followers and potential followers will be ready to receive your message. There is no calculation to allow one post to be carefully planned to accomplish more than some other post.

Here's what works: consistent persistent personal relevant content.

Always has. Always will. No trickery or algorithms needed.

Update

An article by the social media management tool company Buffer makes the same point with more specifics.

Success & Failure: 2 Methods of Each

For the team at Chief Virtual Officer, our Business Manager, Joel D Canfield, has created some videos. This is one of them. All about Success & Failure. Enjoy!

When's the Last Time You Said "Yes" But Did "No" ?

Meeting organizers know too well that if you get 40 "yes" RSVPs, you'll get 12 attendees, maybe even less.

When did it become so acceptable to say yes, I'll be there, and then not only fail to show, but to simply ignore the entire thing?

Yes, I'm a crusty old codger who believes that manners matter as a foundation of business. But I'll bet even you young folks would prefer to get 13 yeses and 27 maybes than have those 27 people say something they don't really mean.

Don't use your RSVP as a way to reward the meeting organizer for having a good idea. Don't use it to fill up your calendar so you look busy (nobody cares if you're busy; they're too busy to notice.) Don't tell them what you hope to do, tell them what you intend to do.

Hold yourself accountable for keeping your word in even the little things. It's the only way to be absolutely sure you'll be keeping your word when the big things come along.

Besides, your prospects might be watching, and you know you want them to think you keep your word, right?