6 Ways to Get Your Book Noticed Using Social Media

There are of course many ways to market and get your book noticed on social media. Here are two specific ways for each of the following social media platforms. Some of these are less in-your-face book marketing and more about connecting with people so they want to learn more about you and your book.

Twitter

  1. Promote interesting quotes from your book. You probably have a ton of interesting tips or tidbits in your nonfiction book. Share those quotes in fun ways that engage your audience and encourages them to share with your audience. It’s fun to use a graphic-design tool such as Canva.com to do this. If you have images in your books, you can upload these to Canva, overlay your quote, and share these on Twitter. Images like that tend to get more likes and shares than plain text messages. You can do the same thing with book reviews. Take your 5-star book reviews from Amazon and post short excerpts of them in an image that you share. Here is a PDF I created with some sample images I created for my own nonfiction book.
  2. Tweet Your Milestones. Did you just send your manuscript off to the editor? Did your cover designer just give you the final cover design? Did you just sell 100 copies to a local school? Tweet about it. And you can make it fun for others to share by creating an image in Canva.com with the text being your milestone (Just sold 100 copies!)

Facebook

  1. Like other pages related to your topic. Do this as your own page. Here's how: go to a page you want to like and click on the box with the ellipses right under the main banner and to the right of the Like, Follow, Share boxes. A box pops up and one of the options is Like as your Page. That’s what you want to click. You may find that page reciprocates and likes your page as well. The big advantage here though is that now you can like and comment on their page as your own page – not just you as your personal profile. This is a great way to get more exposure for your own page. Your comments might be tips you can share from your own book. You don’t want to be too self-promotional when you do that. Just share the tip as your own page and say there’s more information found in Chapter 10, for example, of your book. Let people come ask you more about it. I also suggest sharing your Facebook page posts on your personal timeline with a comment.
  2. Invest in ads. You don’t have to spend a lot of money. In fact, you can spend as little as $1 per day. I suggest starting small and testing to see what works and what doesn’t and then later you can work with a larger budget if you want. Several of my clients have run a one-week ad for just $7 and found they get great results. They get more page likes, engagement, and their posts reach a much larger audience. I learned about this $1 per day idea from Dennis Yu of Blitz Metrics and highly recommend investing in his course. You can sign up for the course at blitzmetrics.com/fdd/. With the recent changes at Facebook, this is one way your page is more likely to be seen – particularly if you pay to boost posts that are already getting engagement – which means people are commenting on the post.

LinkedIn

  1. Publish articles on LinkedIn Pulse. Write articles related to your book topic and publish these on LinkedIn to showcase your expertise. It’s very easy. When you log in to LinkedIn one of your choices to post is to write an article. Include an image and a link at the end of your article to where they can learn more about you – your website or Amazon author page. These articles can be seen by people who aren’t even connected to you. Be sure to follow up and reply to any comments made on your articles. Remember to view the analytics for your articles to see how many people are viewing them, liking them, and sharing them.
  2. Utilize groups. If you haven’t yet joined any groups, do so. Find groups related to your book’s topic and join them. Then engage in conversations already there. As with any social network, enlighten and educate with your comments. Show your expertise so people will want to come view your profile, connect with you, and eventually learn about your book. You might even consider starting your own group.

If you like this post, you’ll want to check out our Be Social – Get Noticed monthly service packages.

4 of My Favorite Tips for Twitter and More

Here are 4 of my favorite social media tips. Perhaps you could plan to implement one each week next month.

  1. Use Twitter’s 280 characters creatively. Now that Twitter has doubled their character limit from 140 to 280 authors have room to get more creative. Something I’ve done is to write a tweet related to a book’s topic, perhaps including a link to an outside source. Then after a space, write a short tweet mentioning that, say, Chapter 10 of my book addresses that topic.
    • As an example, one client has a self-help book with a chapter on how creativity is therapeutic. She links to an article at Huffington Post titled, Is Creativity Therapeutic and Can Art Make Us Happier. Then tweets, Chapter 6 of my book has a section on this very topic, Creativity is Therapeutic and Clears the Mind, and links to her book page on her website.
  2. Tag People. Use the @ symbol to tag people on Twitter. You can also tag people on Facebook and LinkedIn. Do this when you mention that person in your post. Perhaps you are sharing a blog post that includes a quote from that person. Tagging is a great way to let them know you’ve mentioned them and they may share what you’ve posted. On Facebook you can tag business pages if you’re mentioning them in your post.
  3. Use Twitter Lists. I’ve created and use several lists. One is a list of others who, like Ausoma, tweet about social media for nonfiction authors. I use that to find something relevant to retweet every day. Other lists are of literary agents, editors, and publishers.
  4. Use Analytics and Insights. As with any marketing, you want to see what’s working, what’s not, and where you can improve. Use the analytics and insights provided by Twitter, Facebook, and even LinkedIn to see what posts are getting the most likes, shares, comments, etc. and which ones aren’t getting any engagement. Then you can see what types of posts to keep creating and which ones aren’t effective.

3 Keys to Successfully Using Social Media for Book Promotion

  1. Social media marketing needs to be viewed as a long-term investment. Nonfiction authors successfully using social media to market their books realize that it is an investment and they are in it for the long haul. They realize they need to continually market their book if they want to keep selling copies of it.
  2. Social means engagement. Get to know your audience. Find out what they want and need. Converse with them. Offer valuable information. Then they will be more likely to choose to purchase your book.
  3. Review your social media marketing profiles and book marketing efforts at least once a year and update as needed. Mix it up. Do something different. Be Social. Get Noticed.

If you like this post, you’ll want to check out our Be Social – Get Noticed monthly service packages.

6 Principles of Social Media

Many authors think first of traditional book marketing – reaching out to traditional media and publicity sources to get interviews, book signing events, advertising. Social media is another piece of the marketing puzzle not to be missed.

The important point to remember about using social media to market your book is that it’s just that – social. That means really engaging with your audience on each network. Social media can be a lot of fun. You can be creative.

Another important reason to use social media is that you can reach a larger audience interested in your book - if you do it right.

These simple tips are great for beginners and a good refresher for everyone.
… more … "6 Principles of Social Media"

Your Book Proposal and Book Marketing

Your Book Proposal and Book MarketingReady to send your book proposal to a publisher? They are more likely to take notice of your proposal if it includes a strong Book Marketing section. This section should be the biggest part of your proposal and detail your ongoing book marketing efforts. As an example of what to include in a book proposal, here's one author's book proposal contents.

Contents of a Book Proposal

  • Overview
  • About the Author
  • Target Market
  • Marketing and Book Promotion
  • Competitive and Complementary Books
  • Contents of the Book
  • Chapter Summaries
  • Sample Chapters

This author's Marketing and Book Promotion section is 10 pages long with several specific sections.

Marketing and Book Promotion

  • Introductory paragraph
  • Networking
  • Global Vision
  • Social Media
  • Public Relations
  • Outreach
  • Specialty Venues
  • Presentations

Social Media Section

The social media section of this nonfiction author's book proposal includes reference to his website and blog and the purpose of his website. He states, "It serves as a platform to support the author's brand. It is updated regularly to keep it fresh and interesting."

This section also includes a chart showing quarterly numbers for website page views, Twitter followers, Facebook Page fans, Facebook page reach, Facebook page engagement, Instagram followers, and LinkedIn Pulse followers. He provides percentages of increase for each social media platform for the past year. He also details the LinkedIn groups in which he is active.

A screenshot of the results of a Facebook promotion are included at the suggestion of a publicist. This particular promotion was done of a blog post that is a book excerpt to show a publisher that the book is already garnering interest.

Need help getting your social media platforms optimized so a publisher takes notice of your book proposal? Sign up for our Peace of Mind Social Media Audit & Consultation.

Teleseminar: 6 Ways to Market Your Nonfiction Book on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn

Event Date: February 28, 2018 | Time: 10AM PST / 1PM EST

Nonfiction Authors AssociationJoin me on the weekly Nonfiction Authors Association teleseminar as I share 6 Ways to Market Your Nonfiction Book on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

What We Will Discuss

  • Why a nonfiction author would market their book using social media
  • Basic Dos and Don'ts for social media marketing (my 6 Principles of Social Media)
  • Tips for more advanced social media users
  • My favorite ways for marketing your book on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn

How to Participate

Live access to the weekly teleseminars is free to all Nonfiction Authors Association members. Anyone can join as a free Basic member. Learn more about how to participate here