Let Insiders (and Outsiders) Choose Themselves

We all subscribe to newsletters we mean to read and then don't. And then we transfer that feeling to our readers and worry they've done the same thing. I combat that by regularly asking folks to unsubscribe. (And if I discover I'm not reading a newsletter, I unsub myself. There's only so much time. We can't do it all. What we cull is as important as what we keep.)

Telling them it's okay to leave helps cull the folks who are staying because they're too nice to unsubscribe.

Everyone is busy. I see the choices as (a) be easy to ignore, and become One of Those Newsletters, or (b) be so good they don't want to ignore you.

Yeah, (b) is harder. It's also the professional choice.

Best Times to Post on Social Media: Rules vs Principles vs Reality

There is no "best time to post" on any social media.

Any study that claims to reveal the perfect time to post on any social media platform is, instead, revealing the mathematical results of an algorithm they used to calculate certain (possibly beneficial) outcomes at one particular moment in time, for some general group of posters.

No one can possibly tell you when the bulk of your followers and potential followers will be ready to receive your message. There is no calculation to allow one post to be carefully planned to accomplish more than some other post.

Here's what works: consistent persistent personal relevant content.

Always has. Always will. No trickery or algorithms needed.


An article by the social media management tool company Buffer makes the same point with more specifics.

Dear Former Newsletter Subscriber

Social media is not about making the most connections, it's about making the right connections.

Dear Former Newsletter Subscriber:

Thank you for unsubscribing from my newsletter. I hope the process was clear and simple.

Don’t take this wrong, but I’m glad you left. Here’s why:

… more … "Dear Former Newsletter Subscriber"

Personal: Trust Trumps All

Our last post was about making sure your newsletter is relevant, and before that, the effect of ensuring it's anticipated. The final post in this short series is about how being personal trumps them both.

When a stranger interrupts, it's offensive, annoying.

When a close friend interrupts, it's probably just conversation. We do it all the time. Sure, in some settings we're careful to be more formal, to listen politely until the other person is done speaking, to use active listening and all those cool techniques for really connecting.

But if you and I are chatting about music and you start raving about Eric Clapton and I butt in with "Clapton has gotten boring; have you heard Steve Winwood play guitar lately?" that's just conversation — friends talk over each other and interrupt and generally treat conversation like a rugby scrum.

And we love it. … more … "Personal: Trust Trumps All"

If It Is Relevant They Will Read

Our last post was about making sure your newsletter is anticipated. Today: what happens when it's relevant.

If your favorite show is interrupted so Bob can yell at you about his low low life-insurance prices, you'll resent it. (Maybe you'll just numbly endure, but we'll call that "resentment" for now.)

If your favorite show is interrupted so the National Weather Service can alert you to a life-threatening situation hovering over your rooftop, you won't resent it, you'll appreciate it.
It wasn't personal.

It wasn't anticipated.

When the level of relevance reaches 100% personal and anticipated can drop to zero and the message will still be appreciated.

… more … "If It Is Relevant They Will Read"