What Would You Do with an Extra Half Day a Week?

Our clients save, on average, half a day a week by handing off the repetitive social media tasks to Ausoma.

What could you do with an extra half a day a week?

You could spend more time on other tasks you feel aren’t getting your full attention now.

You could spend time on Quadrant 2 activities, those tasks which are important, but not urgent, and therefore fall to the bottom of every tasklist ever written.

Would you have time to take on another client?

Maybe you’d spend more time with family. I know I would.

You could write a book. If you write at my pace, you’d have a 60,000-word book done in two years without taking time from anything else.

Save up the half days until you have a couple and take a long weekend, a short vacation.

Or perhaps take a continuing education course and your local community college, or online.

Time it right and attend a conference.

Spend the time broadening your horizons by learning a language.

Broaden your horizons in a different way and take art classes or learn to play a musical instrument.

Your budget may not allow you to hire someone to manage your social media for you. We get that. If it does, though, what would you do with an extra half day a week?

What Has Your Social Media Consultant Done for You Today?

At a recent meetup for local authors we met Ernest Sears Jr. who had written a book about the benefits of culling destructive relationships from our lives.

Ernest wasn’t happy with his book’s cover. The book was ready, Ernest was ready, but the cover wasn’t what he wanted: it looked like a book about juicing, which it’s not. (That’s it on the right.)

We no longer provide cover design services, but we know people who do. After referring Ernest to Lewis Agrell, they worked together to give the book a new cover. It’s more dynamic, and does a better job of conveying the book’s self-help content.

Ernest Was Not a Client

This wasn’t a business transaction, it was a gift. We met someone who had a need, and we knew someone who could fill it.

Business isn’t only about transactions, it’s about people, generosity, fulfillment, even joy. We love what we do, we really like authors and the publishing world, and we’re always glad to help any way we can—even if someone isn’t paying us money.

What has your social media consultant done for you today?

Persistence and Regularity Are the Keys to the Marketing Marathon

Watching traditional advertising all our lives, we’ve learned the lie that marketing = big splash.

Advertising, a small part of marketing, can benefit from a big splash.

We’re talking about marketing, your ongoing efforts to connect with people who’ll benefit from and appreciate your message. Like any relationship, it takes time.

More than that, it takes persistence and regularity. No friendship ever came from a single interaction, or meeting three times a year apart. Close connections come from regular contact and conversation. It’s work. That’s right, having relationships is work (you knew that) and marketing is about relationships, therefore, marketing is work.

You knew that, too.

Show up every day. That doesn’t mean blog every day, or do any one thing every day. Blog regularly. Weekly is better than monthly. Chat on Twitter, Facebook, wherever you hang out. Ping an old client or another author who writes like you. Give away a book at the coffee shop. One of yours, or someone else’s even.

Persistent regular activity is the endless dripping that makes marketing effective.

Help Us Make More Connections

After a challenging first half of the year we’re keeping ourselves alert to the connections we’re making in the industry. The more people we help, the better our own business does.

Sue wants to do more of her Getting to Know You calls. While these calls never include a sales pitch of any kind, the honest personal connections that result have been consistently helpful—on both sides.

Who do you know in the publishing industry? Could be an agent, a publisher, a designer: if they’re in publishing, point them to this post and let them know two things:

  1. We’d love to connect to learn about them.
  2. We abhor pushy sales pitches disguised as ‘friendly chats’ so when they talk to Sue, they’re safe.

Do You Really Need to Be Online?

The Dream

Every time social media as a marketing tool for authors comes up, someone mentions that famous author who doesn’t blog, the rich author who has no online presence whatsoever. The argument is that you don’t need an online presence, blogging, social media, to become rich and famous, or succeed in whatever way you define success, as an author.

Back to Reality

Yes, it’s possible to become a best-seller, rich and famous, without ever going online.

It’s also possible to cross the ocean in a rowboat. I’ve read about it. It’s not fun.

If you truly deeply hate social media, find other ways. But if you just don’t want to do the work of blogging and interacting online, or if you’re just being contrary, you’re making it so very hard on yourself.

Speaking in absolutes is always counterproductive (oh, I see what I did there.) But as a general rule, it is best if an author has a blog and posts regularly. It is best if an author has a social media presence and engages there regularly. It is best to make use of the tools that will engage with your potential audience where they are: online.