Grow Your Nonfiction Author Business in February

This month’s short tip to help your grow your nonfiction author business is: Schedule a get-to-know your chat with someone you’re connected with on LinkedIn. Take this opportunity to see how you can help them in their business. You may find your own business grows in unexpected ways.

Here’s an article I wrote about how I do this.

I’d love to get to know you and your business better. Use this link to schedule a call with me so I can know who best to refer to you.

Help Us Make More Connections

After a challenging first half of the year we’re keeping ourselves alert to the connections we’re making in the industry. The more people we help, the better our own business does.

Sue wants to do more of her Getting to Know You calls. While these calls never include a sales pitch of any kind, the honest personal connections that result have been consistently helpful—on both sides.

Who do you know in the publishing industry? Could be an agent, a publisher, a designer: if they’re in publishing, point them to this post and let them know two things:

  1. We’d love to connect to learn about them.
  2. We abhor pushy sales pitches disguised as ‘friendly chats’ so when they talk to Sue, they’re safe.

Trust, Loyalty, and Long-Term Commitments

Did you know Ausoma doesn’t require long-term commitments from our clients? Our only contract is a service agreement stating the scope of work and cost, and an agreement to provide 30 days notice to cancel services. While we strongly recommend a 90 day commitment for new clients because it takes time to achieve results, no client is bound to us by a long-term contract. We take the risk, not the client.

Yet most stay long term.

If people stay when they don’t have to, spend their hard earned money with no contractual obligation forcing them, there must be something else keeping them.

If you’d like to find out what that is, just ask.

Video: All Your Social Media Leads to Your Newsletter

Let Insiders (and Outsiders) Choose Themselves

We all subscribe to newsletters we mean to read and then don’t. And then we transfer that feeling to our readers and worry they’ve done the same thing. I combat that by regularly asking folks to unsubscribe. (And if I discover I’m not reading a newsletter, I unsub myself. There’s only so much time. We can’t do it all. What we cull is as important as what we keep.)

Telling them it’s okay to leave helps cull the folks who are staying because they’re too nice to unsubscribe.

Everyone is busy. I see the choices as (a) be easy to ignore, and become One of Those Newsletters, or (b) be so good they don’t want to ignore you.

Yeah, (b) is harder. It’s also the professional choice.