4 Tips For Writing Effective CTAs on Social Media

Today, a guest post from Stuart Cooke, Blog Editor at Irish Parcels, a courier comparison service based in Dublin.

A call to action is, in a nutshell, a prompt to get your reader to do something. Whether you want to drive more traffic to a blog post or landing page, for your readers to sign up for a free trial, to get a quote, or download an app—implementing effective calls to action in your social media strategy can do wonders to help with all of that. If you’re struggling to write CTAs that convert, we’re discussing some top tips to help you make them more effective.

Ask for Action
It really goes without saying, but call to actions are called that for a reason. Their entire purpose is an invitation to act—so don’t be afraid to make that abundantly clear to your readers. The most effective way to do this is by being mindful of the language that you use in your copy, by taking that extra step to ask for action. Make use of powerful command verbs, such as “sign up”, “download”, “learn more”, and “share”, to name but a few. It sounds easy, but this powerful addition of outright asking for action is often overlooked, and so applying this simple technique to your strategy could really set you well ahead of your competitors.

To add to this, it never hurts to add a sense of urgency to your CTAs, to make your asking for action that little bit more impactful. Escalate the invitation to act even further by adding the psychological trigger of immediacy and exclusivity. One of the most effective ways to do this is by limiting time, for example, “get a quote today” or “today is the last day to sign up for our free trial”—this technique usually works wonders in enticing readers to respond to CTAs.

Write from the Reader’s Perspective
If you hope to craft CTAs that actually convert, you have to consider the reader’s perspective above everything else. If your CTAs aren’t converting, it could be because you’re using too many jargon terms that are all too easy to gloss over, making you lose the attention span of your readers. An effective way to combat that is, instead of making your CTA feel like a sales pitch, make it feel more like a conversation between friends. Make it personal by using “you” and “yours” to make your readers feel like you care (because, well, you do!) and go out of your way to show readers what’s in it for them, because at the end of the way, that’s what they truly care about. They don’t necessarily care about what you or your business does, they care about what they can get from you, so make that obvious in all of your CTAs.
Be Impactful with Images
The majority of social media platforms are becoming increasingly more visual. With that in mind, images should be key in your strategy for crafting more effective CTAs. After all, it is frequently proven that humans process images much faster than words. So, why not use that fact to your advantage? Impactful images and graphics can go a long way in enticing readers to respond to your CTAs. It goes without saying that creating aesthetically pleasing visuals will take a little more time and effort, but you will quickly find it will grab much more attention.
Measure your efforts
Testing different CTAs is a no-brainer, and a fool-proof way to figure out exactly what works best for your business. The great thing about CTAs is that they are measurable. There’s no doubt about it— you should absolutely keep an eye on the analytics, and monitor how well your CTAs are performing. What is the click-through rate? Are they converting? If you are getting the results you hoped for, tweak your CTA and see how things change. Switch up your visuals, re-word your copy, refine and polish until you get the results you’re hoping for.

5 Ways to Provide the Fresh Blog Content Your Fans Crave

We've all seen a teenager open the refrigerator for the thirteenth time hoping miraculously that a pizza has appeared where only broccoli lay before.

There’s a marvelous scene in one of the Crocodile Dundee movies where someone points out that his hotel room has a television. He turns it on saying, “I've seen television before.” As the I Love Lucy theme fades in he says, “Yup, that’s what was on”.

Can you imagine if the food in the fridge really never changed or if the show on television was actually always the same?

There are some activities in life which hinge on variety, newness, change, to keep our attention. Eating the same foods over and over again gets boring fast – even pizza.

The single greatest reason for potential fans (which means potential purchasers of your book) to visit your website is to find something new.

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6 Tools to Get You Writing: Which Do You Need Most?

A wrap up of 6 tools to get you writing instead of whimpering in the fetal position on the closet floor.

Resistance the AmygdalaHere they are again:

  1. Environment—Make the place you create your art a place you enjoy being.
  2. Schedule—Habit and ritual give you power when courting the Muse.
  3. Timer—You can do anything for 5 minutes.
  4. Prewriting—Starting comes before finishing.
  5. SMART Goals—You know what they are, but you don't use them in your writing—yet.
  6. Finding Why—Knowing your true motivation for writing and keeping it top of mind is like having motivation on tap.

Does one of them jump out as something you could really use? Do any seem simplistic, pointless, wrong? What's missing?

I'd love to offer some free coaching in the comments below. Answer any of those questions or ask any of your own, and I'll spend however long it takes to help you use those tools to get yourself writing.

My Writing Rituals

A songwriter friend, Charlie Cheney, asked about my habits and rituals. This is my quick unedited response to him. Later, a detailed wrap to the 6 tools to get you writing.

Here are the rituals I developed which allowed me to write 4,000 words a day quite often and as much as 10,000 words at least once, and how they've changed over time.

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Finding Why (#6 of 6 Tools to Get You Writing)

#6 of 6 tools to get you writing instead of whimpering in the fetal position on the closet floor.

It's easy to lose track of why you wanted to be a writer in the first place. If you have vague dreams of fame or fortune, those won't keep you going, especially when they don't materialize quickly.

While we'd all love to be rich and famous, I don't think that's why you write. It's not why I write.

I write because I love the feel of words. I write because I have feelings which are clarified only when I find words to put them in. I have ideas which might benefit others. I have questions.

I believe writing takes the vague, wandering abstracts out of my head and makes them clear, understandable things I can look at and play with. I believe it helps me decide whether they should remain part of my life or be forgotten in the drawer.

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