Grow Your Nonfiction Author Business in October

social media iconsWhat will you do this month to grow your author business?

Here’s an idea: Create some tweets and social media posts, including creating some visuals, and schedule them to publish this month.

Not sure what to create for visuals? Have a look at some examples we’ve done for clients.

The Series

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Grow Your Nonfiction Author Business in July

Facebook logoWhich Facebook groups are your target audience in? Join one or more of those groups and spend ten minutes a week engaging.

Answer questions.
Ask questions.
Don’t pitch your book or services.
Spend time really engaging.

Do you have a Facebook group? Share a link in the comments so I can go check it out.

The Series

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Facebook Video That Engages and Converts

Social Insider conducted a study of over 9 million Facebook videos. You might like to read the full report, but here is a brief summary of the results, all of which I find surprising:

  • Video use on Facebook is increasing steadily
  • Vertical videos engage more than landscape/horizontal
  • The optimal length is 2-5 minutes
  • 3 times as many people watch live video as pre-recorded, but only 11% of businesses on Facebook do live video
  • Descriptions over 300 words work better than shorter descriptions, and questions seem to have no effect on engagement.

Social Media Paint-by-Numbers: Conclusions

Part of a series

In our review of Hubspot’s report on social media platforms we’ve discussed how each is most effectively used:

  • Twitter: seeking what’s new, connecting with you (warm & fuzzy)
  • Facebook: communicating with those they know, blocking those who annoy (warm & fuzzy)
  • Instagram: bonding, seeking increased intimacy (warm & fuzzy)
  • YouTube: seeking what’s new, taking action (NOT the place for warm & fuzzy)
  • LinkedIn: communication, open discussion (businesslike)

Here’s the shortest social media plan in the world: use Twitter and YouTube to let novelty-seekers get to know you, then Instagram and Facebook to increase the connection, and finally, LinkedIn to forge a business relationship.

That’s what Ausoma helps you do: to be social and get noticed.

If you’ve been struggling with your social media presence, or you’d like confirmation that you’re on the right track, our free 15-minute social media consultation is the place to start.

Paint-by-Numbers: Facebook

Part of a series

According to the research on social media usage patterns reported in HubSpot’s article, people generally use Facebook for communicating and blocking. While those actions are both obvious, what may not be obvious is that both have value to you, the entrepreneur author.

Communicating

Good Facebook posts encourage followers to communicate with you as a brand. Just as important, a good post encourages followers to communicate about you with their existing circle.

Blocking

More than those of any other social media platform, Facebook users are more likely to block unwanted content. Reasons for blocking range from the extreme (content the user finds offensive) to benign (content the user has no interest in.)

What to Do

  • Use Facebook for two-way communication. Write posts which clearly indicate your desire to engage, and then, when followers respond, keep up your end of the conversation.
  • Give your followers the words for word-of-mouth. Write posts which are good communication with your followers but which are also shareable—and ask your followers to share them.
  • Be yourself unashamedly. Write posts that will make your followers feel like insiders, part of your tribe, even at the risk of alienating others.

What NOT to Do

Facebook is, surprisingly to me at least, a warm and fuzzy place for most users. They’re chatting with family, catching up with old friends, sharing a laugh.

Do not use this friendly communication channel to hawk your wares. Do not pester, badger, harass, harry, or otherwise sell them to death. The type of selling you’ll do on Facebook is what you’d do at the coffee shop with a friend: you might mention your book or services if it comes up naturally in the conversation, in fact, you should, but otherwise, it’s not a pitch-fest, it’s a conversation.

An adjunct: in that coffee shop conversation, you wouldn’t send your friend somewhere else to, say, get a scone to go with their tea, or suggest that the napkins down the street are softer and more absorbent. It turns out that linking away from Facebook isn’t very effective. Keep people on your channel; they’ll go find you elsewhere if and when they’re in the mood.

Do not water down your personality. If anything, dial it up a little. Your insiders will love you more. The propensity to block unwanted content on Facebook is a plus for you: it means you’re not wasting effort and possibly an advertising budget chasing fence-sitters and the uninterested.

Allowing potential followers to self-select is exactly the right thing to do, whether they get down off the fence on the inside or the outside. After all, you can’t have insiders if there are no outsiders.