Randy Ingermanson’s 10 Commandments of Marketing

This gem of a list dropped in Randy “Snowflake Guy” Ingermanson’s newsletter today.

The 10 Commandments of Marketing

  1. Always know what is the special magic that delights your Target Audience.
  2. Focus all your marketing efforts ONLY on your Target Audience. This means that all your marketing should be designed to delight your Target Audience.
  3. Never do any marketing action without a reason. (And you need to know what that reason is.)
  4. There are three valid reasons for any marketing action—either it Attracts or Engages or Converts someone in your Target Audience.
  5. You must first Attract someone before you can Engage them.
  6. You must first Engage someone before you can Convert them.
  7. Any valid marketing plan must sketch out at least one complete Marketing Pipeline—in which you Attract someone in your Target Audience, then Engage that same person, and finally Convert that same person. You can use any combination of marketing tactics you like, as long as they make a complete Marketing Pipeline.
  8. Always measure every possible element of your Marketing Pipelines. You can usually measure more than you think. If there is no way to measure any element of a Marketing Pipeline, then you are not doing marketing, you are doing wishful thinking. Never execute a plan that is just wishful thinking.
  9. Look at your measurements on a regular schedule. Stop doing things that don’t work. Improve things that could work better.
  10. As much as possible, design your Marketing Pipelines as automated machines. It’s hard to make money if a Marketing Pipeline depends on you interacting one-to-one with each person in your Target Audience. If your personal effort is an essential part of a Marketing Pipeline, then try to apply that effort in one-to-many mode, not one-to-one.

Anyone who works with Ausoma can tell you we believe these commandments and implement them so nonfiction authors can be social and get noticed.

This article is reprinted by permission of the author.

Award-winning novelist Randy Ingermanson, “the Snowflake Guy,” publishes the free monthly Advanced Fiction Writing E-zine. If you want to learn the craft and marketing of fiction, AND make your writing more valuable to editors, AND have FUN doing it, visit http://www.AdvancedFictionWriting.com.

Grow Your Nonfiction Author Business in February

This month’s short tip to help your grow your nonfiction author business is: Schedule a get-to-know your chat with someone you’re connected with on LinkedIn. Take this opportunity to see how you can help them in their business. You may find your own business grows in unexpected ways.

Here’s an article I wrote about how I do this.

I’d love to get to know you and your business better. Use this link to schedule a call with me so I can know who best to refer to you.

The Series

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February
March
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May
June

What Has Your Social Media Consultant Done for You Today?

At a recent meetup for local authors we met Ernest Sears Jr. who had written a book about the benefits of culling destructive relationships from our lives.

Ernest wasn’t happy with his book’s cover. The book was ready, Ernest was ready, but the cover wasn’t what he wanted: it looked like a book about juicing, which it’s not. (That’s it on the right.)

We no longer provide cover design services, but we know people who do. After referring Ernest to Lewis Agrell, they worked together to give the book a new cover. It’s more dynamic, and does a better job of conveying the book’s self-help content.

Ernest Was Not a Client

This wasn’t a business transaction, it was a gift. We met someone who had a need, and we knew someone who could fill it.

Business isn’t only about transactions, it’s about people, generosity, fulfillment, even joy. We love what we do, we really like authors and the publishing world, and we’re always glad to help any way we can—even if someone isn’t paying us money.

What has your social media consultant done for you today?

The 80/20 Principle in Social Media Marketing

How does the 80/20 principle apply in social media marketing? In short, it means that about 20% of your messages are self-promotion, ‘buy-my-book’ messages and 80% of your messages are generous, sharing what your audience finds valuable and informative.

This is important for authors trying to promote their books. If your audience sees the majority of your messages are self-promotion, they will quickly lose interest. Turn that around. Make the majority of your messages generous, information sharing.

Ask yourself: what does my reader want? What does my reader need? Then share! What you share can be tips from your book. That will encourage your audience to buy your book whether or not you specifically promote it. Also share links to other helpful information provided from other sources.

The 80/20 numbers are not carved in stone. It’s not a rule. It’s a principle. The important thing is to remember this principle in all your social media marketing.

Share more than you promote.

Note from Joel

While this is not really an application of the Pareto Principle wherein most of our results come from a small portion of our effort, it’s convenient to reuse the numbers 80 and 20 partly because they’ll be easy to remember. But hey, perhaps we’ll write another post about applying the Pareto Principle in your marketing efforts, because it definitely applies.

Expanding Your Network 15 Minutes at a Time

This year Sue has been using an old-fashioned method to expand her social network. Because she’s doing it right, it has not only delivered results but it’s been fun.

Any time she comes across the social media profile of someone interesting (from a professional perspective) she spends a little time learning more about them, then invites them to have a 15-minute phone call to get to know each other. She calls them Getting to Know You calls. (I’m the writer in the family but since she pays my bills I’ll stay out of her business.)

Yes, that’s right, it’s the old “Can I buy you a cup of coffee?” ploy, ruined by professional networkers a decade ago.

Here’s how Sue does it right:

  1. She spent the time to develop a reputation for sincerity and generosity.
  2. She takes the time to get to know something about the other person, even interacting at their blog or other social media accounts, before she raises the idea of chatting on the phone.
  3. When she approaches them, she expresses a specific interest in something they do or offer.
  4. Wait, before that, she actually feels a genuine interest in something they do or offer. That’s the whole point: they’re professionally interesting.
  5. She uses a simple free tool called Calendly to allow them to schedule their call anytime she’s free and which is convenient for them. No phone tag or endless scheduling emails.
  6. During the conversation, she actually listens to them, treats them with dignity and respect, and only shares what Ausoma does as something that might support their business. No sales pitch. Ever. (Did we get that part? That’s what killed the “cup of coffee” gag, remember?)
  7. She keeps in touch, and when she finds something of value to them she shares it.

The theme there is generosity. People can tell when you’re “having a chat” but it’s all about you.

They can also tell, from a mile away, when you’re a sincere and generous person who believes that the more you help others, the better your own business and life are.