Practice Your Interview

Practice makes perfect.

Practice your interview answers so you know them well and sound natural. The interviewer may change the order of the questions. Being well prepared means you’ll be able to smoothly answer any question they ask, whenever they ask it.

Time your answers.

This will help you stay within your allotted time. Your host will appreciate it if you don’t run over. Some use a recording program that will stop recording after a certain time period. You don’t want your interview cut short!

What is Your Interview Message?

Before you even pitch yourself as a guest to be interviewed, know what your objectives are.

Do you want listeners to buy your book? Buy a service you’re offering? Subscribe to your newsletter? Attend an event?

While you may have many goals, you can only have one primary goal. That’s what “primary” means. Choose one.

  • Prepare your main message with that objective in mind.
  • Prepare three key points to deliver that main message.

The Series

January: Interview Tips for Nonfiction Authors
February: Are You Prepared for Your Interview?
March: What is Your Interview Message?

Are You Prepared for Your Interview?

Another in a series of interview tips for authors.

If your interview is on an established show, listen to previous interviews your host has recorded. This will give you a feel of how they ask questions and what they expect of their guests. You can usually provide a list of questions and answers, or talking points, to your host.

Prepare and rehearse answers ahead of time. Be flexible. If it seems you need to fill more time, be prepared to slow your pace and have additional information. On the other hand, you may run out of time. Don’t hurry your pace. Instead, plan the interview so the most important questions are asked and answered first.

Let the host know you’re happy to provide more information via email to anyone who has additional questions.

The Series

January: Interview Tips for Nonfiction Authors
February: Are You Prepared for Your Interview?
March: What is Your Interview Message?

Interview Tips for Nonfiction Authors

Each month this year one blog post will include a tip or two for nonfiction authors who do online interviews.

Your interview may be as a guest on a podcast, webinar, or teleseminar. Interviews help build your author business, so you want to be at your best.

First, be sure you have the correct date and time on your calendar. Is your interviewer on the East coast and you’re on the West coast? Their 9am is your 6am! Make sure you get it right by using TimeandDate.com.

Set aside enough time for the interview. It may only be a 30-minute interview. But the interviewer may ask you to be on the line 5-10 minutes before and/or after the interview to prep and wrap up.

The Series

January: Interview Tips for Nonfiction Authors
February: Are You Prepared for Your Interview?
March: What is Your Interview Message?

And THAT’S What Makes Our Audit & Consultation Great

A few days ago I interviewed Sue about her audit and consultation process. Frankly, although I sit next to her all day every day, I’m busy creating stuff and don’t get into the technical details of her work very often.

I was surprised more than once. Don’t tell anyone, but after I found out how much work she puts in and what the client gets back, I’m going to suggest raising the price.

Here’s that interview: http://dl.ausoma.com/Ausoma_social-media-audit.mp3