Social Media Paint-by-Numbers: Conclusions

Part of a series

In our review of Hubspot’s report on social media platforms we’ve discussed how each is most effectively used:

  • Twitter: seeking what’s new, connecting with you (warm & fuzzy)
  • Facebook: communicating with those they know, blocking those who annoy (warm & fuzzy)
  • Instagram: bonding, seeking increased intimacy (warm & fuzzy)
  • YouTube: seeking what’s new, taking action (NOT the place for warm & fuzzy)
  • LinkedIn: communication, open discussion (businesslike)

Here’s the shortest social media plan in the world: use Twitter and YouTube to let novelty-seekers get to know you, then Instagram and Facebook to increase the connection, and finally, LinkedIn to forge a business relationship.

That’s what Ausoma helps you do: to be social and get noticed.

If you’ve been struggling with your social media presence, or you’d like confirmation that you’re on the right track, our free 15-minute social media consultation is the place to start.

Paint by Numbers: LinkedIn

Part of a series

Our final social media paint-by-numbers article is my own. Hubspot’s report does not include LinkedIn, but we encourage all nonfiction authors to have a presence and get involved.

The business slant of LinkedIn means users focus on Communicating and Bridging. There is very little ‘warm and fuzzy’ going on here.

Communicating

Posts and articles not only teach readers, they invite them to connect, and to share what they find valuable with others.

Bridging

The business focus facilitates networking and creates an atmosphere conducive to open discussion, with you, and with other commenters.

What to Do

  • Teach. Write posts and articles that highlight your expertise.
  • Promote others. Share content you find interesting and helpful.
  • Comment. Engage with the community as an active member.

What NOT to Do

  • Don’t pitch. LinkedIn groups frown on hit and run tactics, on a hard sell, on self-promotion. People here are actively looking for good information and connections. Share good information, be a good connection, and they will seek you out.
  • Don’t get silly. Treat LinkedIn like you’d treat a business networking event. Have fun, but no cat videos or pointless jokes.

Next week, the wrap-up.

Grow Your Nonfiction Author Business in March

As a follow up to last month’s tip, this month’s tip to grow your author business is:

Join and Participate in LinkedIn Groups

If you’re already in a group and participating, join another one. A good place to start is to join a group many of your connections are in. What groups is the person you had your get-to-know-you chat with last month in? Join. The key to groups is to participate in discussions, adding your valuable point of view. Once you’ve done that, you can start your own discussion.

One group I’m a member of that you might find useful is Book Marketing Tips.

What groups are you in? Leave a link in the comments so I can check them out.

The Series

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August

Social Media Paint-by-Numbers

A recent research article by HubSpot helped me see why I like certain social media platforms and dislike others. It also contains lessons on how to make better use of both those we like and those we don’t.

As we’ve written before, there’s no magic bullet, no perfect time to post or special place to find all your business in one fell swoop. There is, however, meaningful data on how to use each platform to get the most out of it.

In the coming weeks I’ll be writing about how people (mostly unconsciously) perceive the major social media platforms, and what that translates to for your own use (and, of course, how it affects the services we provide for our clientele.)

Watch for it each Wednesday for the rest of the winter.

The Series

Twitter
Facebook
Instagram
YouTube
LinkedIn
Conclusions

Which Platform Works Best for You?

With all the social media platforms available, authors often ask which one is the best platform for them. My answer: it depends on where your audience is and which one you feel you’d be most comfortable spending time using. Here are four popular ones and my thoughts on each one. Then you decide which one is best for you. (I recommend you set up a profile at each one and then focus on one. More on that in a future post.)

Twitter is a Music Festival

It’s easy to set up a Twitter account and start following people you hope will follow you back. The trap to avoid is following everyone. Follow people who are relevant in some way. Perhaps they’ve tweeted about your topic or have a hashtag in their bio that indicates interest in your topic. Create lists so you can categorize those you follow – other authors, book marketers, publicists, and others.

Because you can tweet often, you drive more traffic to your website from Twitter than other social media platforms. That means your tweets need to have valuable information with a link that readers want to click to learn more.

Yes, it’s easy for your tweets to ‘get lost’ in the huge Twitterverse. However you can make good connections and start conversations that may result in taking the conversation into email. Over the years I’ve made really good connections with people in my industry in this manner, and have even gotten clients through Twitter.

Twitter is like a music festival with many different bands all playing at once on different stages of a huge venue. Thousands of people are attending. It will get noisy, even confusing at times. You might feel lost, that your message isn’t being heard. But those who want to hear what you have to say will find you and listen, just like at a huge music festival. Maybe you went to listen to one or two bands. You’ll seek them out and listen to them. Your audience will seek you out on Twitter and listen to you too – as long as you’ve set up your account and tweet in such a way that they can find you.

Facebook is a Tribe

On Facebook you want to be sure to set up an Author page. Read my previous post on 13 Ways to Utilize Your Facebook Author Page. Be sure to link to the page from your website and invite friends and readers to connect with you on this page. This is where your ‘tribe’ can come backstage with you. You won’t have as many followers on Facebook as you have connections elsewhere. That’s okay. This is where people who are already your readers will come to learn more about you and even connect with other readers.

Think of Facebook as a place where your tribe comes to hang out. They may have first connected with you on Twitter and now want more. Use Facebook to share more about who you are, what you write, links to other information your audience will find value. And of course have fun! Facebook followers tend to be people who like to have fun. :)

LinkedIn is a Professional Networking Connector

LinkedIn is a more professional setting, perfect for nonfiction authors. In addition to connecting with other professionals, you can join and participate in groups, and publish articles related to your topic. I use LinkedIn to deepen connections. I invite strategic connections to a free 15-minute phone call so we can learn more about each other.

Groups are a wonderful tool you can use to start or join in conversations and share your expertise. Writing articles also strengthens your position as an expert in your field.

Instagram is a Snapshot of Life

This social media platform is primarily about visuals – posting photos or images along with text and hashtags. You may want a separate business account for your book. Instagrammers want to know more about your life as an author. They want to see photos of your writing space, perhaps a book store you visited, your cat. Of course you can post about your book too. Just remember that the audience here is more interested in your life – not your book.

If you need some ideas for visuals to post on Instagram, check out this post.

So, which platform works best for you right now?

This may change at a later date so you want to revisit this annually.

  • Are you interested in a music festival and reaching a lot of people? Twitter’s your thing.
  • Do you want your tribe to connect more personally with you and other readers? Use Facebook
  • Is your goal to connect with other professionals and deepen those relationships? LinkedIn is the place.
  • Would you like to connect with readers interested in a more personal look into your life as an author? Dive into Instagram

I’d love to connect with you on any of those social media platforms and hear your comments on this topic. Share a comment below and links to your platforms so I can follow you.