Randy Ingermanson’s 10 Commandments of Marketing

This gem of a list dropped in Randy “Snowflake Guy” Ingermanson’s newsletter today.

The 10 Commandments of Marketing

  1. Always know what is the special magic that delights your Target Audience.
  2. Focus all your marketing efforts ONLY on your Target Audience. This means that all your marketing should be designed to delight your Target Audience.
  3. Never do any marketing action without a reason. (And you need to know what that reason is.)
  4. There are three valid reasons for any marketing action—either it Attracts or Engages or Converts someone in your Target Audience.
  5. You must first Attract someone before you can Engage them.
  6. You must first Engage someone before you can Convert them.
  7. Any valid marketing plan must sketch out at least one complete Marketing Pipeline—in which you Attract someone in your Target Audience, then Engage that same person, and finally Convert that same person. You can use any combination of marketing tactics you like, as long as they make a complete Marketing Pipeline.
  8. Always measure every possible element of your Marketing Pipelines. You can usually measure more than you think. If there is no way to measure any element of a Marketing Pipeline, then you are not doing marketing, you are doing wishful thinking. Never execute a plan that is just wishful thinking.
  9. Look at your measurements on a regular schedule. Stop doing things that don’t work. Improve things that could work better.
  10. As much as possible, design your Marketing Pipelines as automated machines. It’s hard to make money if a Marketing Pipeline depends on you interacting one-to-one with each person in your Target Audience. If your personal effort is an essential part of a Marketing Pipeline, then try to apply that effort in one-to-many mode, not one-to-one.

Anyone who works with Ausoma can tell you we believe these commandments and implement them so nonfiction authors can be social and get noticed.

This article is reprinted by permission of the author.

Award-winning novelist Randy Ingermanson, “the Snowflake Guy,” publishes the free monthly Advanced Fiction Writing E-zine. If you want to learn the craft and marketing of fiction, AND make your writing more valuable to editors, AND have FUN doing it, visit http://www.AdvancedFictionWriting.com.

Video: All Your Social Media Leads to Your Newsletter

Let Insiders (and Outsiders) Choose Themselves

We all subscribe to newsletters we mean to read and then don’t. And then we transfer that feeling to our readers and worry they’ve done the same thing. I combat that by regularly asking folks to unsubscribe. (And if I discover I’m not reading a newsletter, I unsub myself. There’s only so much time. We can’t do it all. What we cull is as important as what we keep.)

Telling them it’s okay to leave helps cull the folks who are staying because they’re too nice to unsubscribe.

Everyone is busy. I see the choices as (a) be easy to ignore, and become One of Those Newsletters, or (b) be so good they don’t want to ignore you.

Yeah, (b) is harder. It’s also the professional choice.

Get the Right People on Your List by Going Organic

One of the biggest mistakes authors make is thinking their newsletter is about selling. Marketing, which is what your newsletter is part of, is about building relationships. When you have good relationships with people, they’ll buy without you “selling” at all.

When you imagine that one person you’re writing your newsletter for, also remember that you’re not dragging a friend down the alley to mug them (because it’s not about money.) Instead, you’re chatting with someone who asked you to talk to them. Would you really say “I’m sure you don’t really want to talk to me, so I’ll keep this brief and infrequent”?

… more … “Get the Right People on Your List by Going Organic”

Don’t Cull Your Email List

My circle of author friends recently discussed how they were all pruning their email lists to remove the people who never opened them. I wailed loudly that this is an enormous mistake.

Pardon me while I get geeky for a moment.

Newsletter tools that report “opens” do not, in reality, know who opened your email (let alone who read it.) The only method possible right now to measure “opens” is to include a tiny invisible image in the email and hope that the recipient will enable their email program’s ability to include images. In Gmail, for instance, images will not be displayed unless you give permission. Many programs, like Microsoft’s ubiquitous Outlook, have a preview pane, allowing a recipient to read your entire email without ever actually opening it and activating the invisible image trigger that notifies the newsletter tool.

… more … “Don’t Cull Your Email List”