Meet Dale Griffiths Stamos, author of RenWomen

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Meet the Author

I worked with Dale a few years back helping to promote her book using social media. She has many creative endeavors and I know you’ll enjoy learning more about her in the interview below.Dale Griffiths Stamos headshot

  • Tell us a little bit about your book and business.

My book is RenWomen: What Modern Renaissance Women Have to Teach Us About Living Rich, Fulfilling Lives.  I co-authored it with my twin brother, Scott Griffiths, and it includes the stories of 16 extraordinary modern Renaissance women from multiple areas: business, the arts, social activism, science, and more.  It is a book that will inspire and motivate women (and men too!) to explore their fullest potential.

  • Why did you write your book?

My twin brother had co-authored a book about modern Renaissance men and we both realized that it was important women got recognized as being Renaissance people as well!

  • How did you publish your book? Traditional publisher, hybrid publisher, self-published?

We self-published the book.

  • How did things change for you as an author in 2020 and how did you manage to weather through the year during the pandemic?

The book was published in 2016 and I spent most of 2017 and some of 2018 marketing the book in the form of book events, signings, and invited presentations and panels. (So I’m grateful I was able to do all that live before this crazy 2020!)  In 2017, I also returned to my other creative endeavors (in my own Renaissance-style) and continued to work on my short film projects. (In all I have written and produced or co-produced six short narrative films, three of which I directed.) These films went to multiple film festivals in 2017-2019, many of which I attended.  So the biggest adjustment in 2020 was that after February, the film festivals I was accepted into all went virtual!  Which will continue into at least part of 2021.  But one advantage to being a writer is that I continue to write new work, quarantined or not!

  • What is your favorite book marketing tip?

If you are self-published OR traditionally published, take marketing into your own hands! Get out there and do signings and book events, and everything else you can think of to get word out about your book. (I actually also did videos about the women in the book, along with a whole podcast series.)

  • What are your goals for 2021?

The new work I have been focusing on in 2020 are feature-length screenplays and a full-length play.  So my goal for 2021 is to get that work out there. (Which can include readings and raising funds for production or finding interested producers.)

  • Where can readers find your book?

https://www.amazon.com/RenWomen-Modern-Renaissance-Living-Fulfilling

http://www.renwomen.com/

https://www.facebook.com/RenWomen

https://www.blogtalkradio.com/renwomen

  • Is there anything else you’d like to share?

Just that in today’s world, having a flexible, multi-dimensional approach to life is not just aspirational, but essential!

Bio

Dale Griffiths Stamos is the co-author of the nonfiction book: RenWomen: What Modern Renaissance Women Have to Teach Us About Living Rich, Fulfilling Lives.  Dale is also an award-winning screenwriter and playwright. She has written and produced or co-produced six short films which have been official selections at multiple film festivals, garnering two audience and two jury awards, as well as three Awards of Excellence from Best Shorts Competition and the Bill Paxton Award from the Ojai Film Festival.  She has penned two feature-length screenplays:  One White Crow and Blue Jay Singing in the Dead of Night which have been named as finalists or semi-finalists in a number of screenwriting competitions including the New York City International Screenplay Awards, StoryPros International Screenplay Contest, Flickers Rhode Island International Film Festival, Creative World Awards and Script Summit. Dale’s short and full-length plays have been produced around the country. She is the recipient of the Heideman Award from Actors Theatre of Louisville, and is a top-ten winner, twice, in the Writers Digest Stage Play Competition.

Meet Cristen Iris, Developmental Editor

This entry is part 9 of 5 in the series Book Industry Experts

This is the first in my 2021 series of book industry experts that will include editors, ghostwriters, book coaches, and other experts in the book industry. Cristen and I first connected a few years back when we both worked with the Nonfiction Authors Association.

Tell us a little bit about your business.Cristen Iris headshot 2

I’m a developmental and substantive editor and book proposal consult who loves developing long-term professional relationships with my clients and other publishing industry pros. I predominately work on nonfiction projects written by experts but am keen to work on well-crafted fiction with a literary bend.

Memoir with its nonfiction base and fiction-like narrative style is one of my favorite things to work on, but I jump at the opportunity to work on anything even remotely related to medical anthropology, sociology, sports, entertainment, or business.

My clients include a New York Times bestselling debut novelist, a GRAMMY Award ® winner, attorneys, researchers and medical doctors, competitive athletes, advocates and activists, and an international entertainment entrepreneur. I’m delighted to have worked with Linda K. Olson (triple-amputee, retired MD, and Parkinson’s advocate) on her recently released memoir, Gone: A Memoir of Love, Body, and Taking Back My Life, listed by Parade Magazine as one of the 24 best memoirs to read in 2020.

I love helping clients develop their writing craft and market acumen, so they can share important information and tell meaningful stories that attract the attention of literary agents, publishers, and readers. What I love most about what I do is the ability to partner with others to do work that has the potential to change lives and shape culture.

How would you describe your ideal client?

My favorite clients are Type As with a sense of humor, the type that are serious about the work but don’t take themselves too seriously. I also prefer working with clients who are multi-book authors and aspire to be traditionally published or published by a publisher that exercises editorial discretion. I also like working with authors who choose to indie-publish for strategic reasons.

Authors who are looking for a one-time, do-this-and-I’ll-pay-you-and-leave aren’t a good fit. The most fulfilling relationships for me are dynamic, collaborative, and strategic because they’re the most fun and get the best results.

How did things change for you in 2020 and how did you manage to weather through the year during the pandemic?

My pandemic year started the first week of January with the sudden death of my 42-year-old friend and brother-in-law. Another relative died suddenly in February, and in March, another one of my young relatives was hospitalized with COVID-19 and according to his doctor, “could have gone either way.”

By April, clients who’d booked large, multi-month projects had put their projects on hold or were moving at a snail’s pace due to interruptions in their lives and concerns about cash flow. The dip was brief. Within a few weeks, emails started flowing in. Lockdowns and layoffs allowed many aspiring authors to focus on their books. I haven’t done the math, but I’m sure I’ve done more projects this year than any other. Having said that, my income compared to last year is down because pricing and timelines got all out of whack early on, and I’ve done more lower-fee projects than high-dollar ones.

On the business side, I have to say that it’s been a great year. The pandemic exacerbated a project management and cash flow frustration I’ve had for several years and was the push I needed to eliminate the service related to it and start offering an hourly consulting rate service that’s been a surprising hit.

If I had to boil the change and the benefits that followed down into two words they would be “focus” and “efficiency.”

On the personal side, I’ve become more aware of how important my husband, sister, and children are to me. That’s given me perspective and a sense of belonging that I haven’t experienced in a while.

What is your favorite tip for using social media?

Well, first I want to encourage you to consider any tips I offer with a degree of skepticism because unless you’re an editor who works with clients like mine and share my goals, this is likely bad advice. But if you see yourself in anything I’ve said about myself, my tip regarding social media is to get off it as soon as possible.

Perhaps a better tip is to consider whether your ideal clients are hanging out on your favorite social media platform and if they go to that platform when looking to hire someone like you. Social media is a time suck. Each of us only have 24 hours in the day. If we want to succeed, we must keep customer conversion expenses low. Time and energy, like money, is limited.

I’m also an introvert (not shy, an introvert). Social media wears me out. My energy is best applied elsewhere. But when I started my business, I spent a lot of time on social media because that’s where authors who were willing to take a chance on a new editor hung out.

So, my tip is to remember that marketing isn’t a one-size-fits all deal. Marketing fiction requires a different approach than nonfiction and both require strategies that keep the ideal reader’s needs and habits top of mind. If you can afford to, hire an experienced consultant who knows your genre and understands your personality and goals and can help you develop a customized social media strategy that gets results. Sue has been doing this a long time and as an author herself can speak directly to what works and doesn’t. I’d start by talking to her.

What are your goals for 2021?

My goals for 2021 are the same as they are every year and are more strategic than specific, which allows me to take advantages of changes in the market and opportunities that always surprise me. In general, they are:

  • develop more high-value industry relationships;
  • stay connected to clients by celebrating their wins and promoting them whenever possible;
  • submit more of my own writing to literary magazines;
  • become even more effective and efficient, so I can serve more clients;
  • and get more outdoor time by taking walking breaks each weekday and hiking, biking, paddle boarding, and snowshoeing with family and friends on weekends.

Where can authors find you?

The best place to find me is at cristeniris.com.

Is there anything else you’d like to share?

I’d just like to encourage anyone who feels beaten down, inept, and bone tired. I feel that way most days, especially when I feel forced to choose between answering emails that keep piling up and doing the actual work.

Running a sustainable and growing business is hard. We must keep all the plates spinning at least fast enough to keep them balanced on the pointy sticks they sit on.

It’s o’dark thirty, and I’m sitting in my bathrobe looking like a two-year-old that nobody’s bothered to hose down lately. It’s easy to feel like we’re doing something wrong, like we have little in common with those real professionals we admire.

But never mind Instagram, photoshopped headshots, and holiday everything-is-wonderful newsletters. That’s all fluff. The meaningful work is ugly work, but it’s the only work worth doing and the stuff that produces results that prove to ourselves and others that we’re competent and resilient.

May your 2020 failures and triumphs propel you into 2021 and may it be your best year yet!

Bio

Cristen Iris is a craft-focused, results-oriented developmental and substantive editor and book proposal consultant. Her clients include a New York Times bestselling debut novelist, a GRAMMY Award ® winner, attorneys, researchers and medical doctors, competitive athletes, advocates and activists, and an international entertainment entrepreneur. Recently, Parade Magazine listed client and triple-amputee Linda K. Olson’s book as one of the 24 best memoirs to read in 2020. Cristen’s personal essays and business columns have been published by, among others, IDAHO magazine, Idaho Business Review, Unbound Northwest, and on the Nonfiction Authors Association blog. When her nose isn’t stuck in a book or her fingers glued to a keyboard, Cristen and her feet can be found anywhere there’s dirt, trees, or water.

Book Launch Teleseminar February 27, 2019 at The Nonfiction Authors Association

Join me for the weekly Nonfiction Authors Association teleseminar February 27, 2019, as I share Social Media Marketing Strategies for Your Book Launch. We will discuss:

  • How far in advance to plan your book launch
  • Specific strategies leading up to your book launch
  • Book launch day strategies
  • Follow up strategies after  your book launch
  • and more

Click on the image to download your Book Launch checklist.

Learn how to participate here.

The Nonfiction Authors Association is a vibrant educational community for aspiring and experienced writers to connect, exchange ideas, and learn about writing, publishing, promoting and profiting from nonfiction books.

NFAA is over 14,000 members strong and growing each day. Members cover many genres of nonfiction books including business, self-development, health and fitness, memoir, history, how-to, science, creative nonfiction and reference books.

Nonfiction Authors AssociationIf you’re serious about your author career, you need to join the NFAA!

Teleseminar: 6 Ways to Market Your Nonfiction Book on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn

Event Date: February 28, 2018 | Time: 10AM PST / 1PM EST

Nonfiction Authors AssociationJoin me on the weekly Nonfiction Authors Association teleseminar as I share 6 Ways to Market Your Nonfiction Book on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

What We Will Discuss

  • Why a nonfiction author would market their book using social media
  • Basic Dos and Don’ts for social media marketing (my 6 Principles of Social Media)
  • Tips for more advanced social media users
  • My favorite ways for marketing your book on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn

How to Participate

Live access to the weekly teleseminars is free to all Nonfiction Authors Association members. Anyone can join as a free Basic member. Learn more about how to participate here

Writing for Your Nonfiction Email List

Your nonfiction email list subscribers may have signed up when you offered a valuable free report. Perhaps you shared tips from your book. To keep your email list subscribers you’ll need to continue offering valuable content with each email you send. When you do this your readers will come to know that you are an authority in your field. It’s you they’ll turn to when they need information on the topic you’re an authority on.

Don’t hold back thinking you’ll save it for your next book. You can still include it in the book, perhaps expanded with more details and statistics. In fact, you’ll be more likely to sell more books to your list because they will have a taste of what’s in it. As with any other marketing, remember the 80/20 rule and provide 80% content to 20% book marketing in your emails. … more … “Writing for Your Nonfiction Email List”