Interview Technology

This entry is part [part not set] of 5 in the series Interview Tips for Authors

Years ago media interviews were done in person at a studio. Today many interviews are done online using Skype, FaceTime, Zoom or some other technology. If you’re not yet familiar with these platforms, now is the time to learn. Willingness to use one of these platforms for an interview increases your chances of being selected.

You’ll still want to prepare well for these interviews. Make sure you still dress the part and have a quiet place to be during the interview. Practice with a friend to be sure your equipment works, the lighting is right, and that you know what to do if something goes wrong.

Embrace the new interview technology, and look and sound your best when speaking about your book’s message.

Grow Your Nonfiction Author Business in August

A primary way to grow your nonfiction author business is speaking engagements.

Though you may start with unpaid speaking engagements (which should include selling your book at the back of the room) you want to become a paid speaker. You can learn about how to do that in the article Transitioning to Paid Speaking at the Nonfiction Authors Association website.

This month’s tip: Pitch yourself as a speaker for an event—either in person or for an online conference.

Tell us about your speaking engagements in the comments below. What do you have coming up? What have been your recent successes? What holds you back from speaking engagements?

The Series

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Best Practices When You Are Interviewed

Another in a series of interview tips for authors.

  • Write up bullet points of your interview. Your interviewer may post these as part of the event description.
  • When you answer questions in your interview, remember to speak in bullet points. Don’t be wordy. Concise, clear answers act as sound bites that will be easy for listeners to remember.
  • Don’t worry if you say something not quite right. Simply correct yourself and continue. Most listeners won’t even notice. If they do, they’ll quickly forget when they realize how smoothly you handle it.
  • The same principle applies if the interviewer makes a mistake. Don’t try to correct them. Just respond with, “Actually . . .” and go on to state the facts.
  • Don’t be afraid of statistics, but use them sparingly. Keep them simple.
  • Use stories to make your ideas come alive for your listeners.
  • Tie your responses in to current events, trends, and news. Connecting with what’s already on the listener’s mind makes your message current as well.

The Series

January: Interview Tips for Nonfiction Authors
February: Are You Prepared for Your Interview?
March: What is Your Interview Message?
April: Practice Your Interview
May: Your Interview Environment
Your Interview Voice
July: Dos and Don’ts in an Interview
August: Best Practices When You Are Interviewed
September: Handling Negative Comments in an Interview
October: Wrapping Up Your Interview
November: Review After Your Interview
December: Enjoy Your Interview

Dos and Don’ts in an Interview

Another in a series of interview tips for authors.

Don’t

Do

Respond with just a word or two Use complete sentences
Use superfluous words like “um”, “you know”, “like” Pause briefly to gather your thoughts
Repeat yourself unnecessarily Prepare clear concise answers to questions
Answer a question you weren’t asked to promote yourself Listen carefully & answer questions you’re asked
Take over the interview Use the host’s name
Use technical terms Speak in a way that’s easy to understand

The Series

January: Interview Tips for Nonfiction Authors
February: Are You Prepared for Your Interview?
March: What is Your Interview Message?
April: Practice Your Interview
May: Your Interview Environment
Your Interview Voice
July: Dos and Don’ts in an Interview
August: Best Practices When You Are Interviewed
September: Handling Negative Comments in an Interview
October: Wrapping Up Your Interview